State LTCOP Staff

Leah McMahon, MA
State Long-Term Care Ombudsman

lmcmahon@disabilitylawco.org

Leah McMahon was named Colorado State Long-Term Care Ombudsman in September 2019, after launching the State PACE Ombudsman Program in 2017. Previously, she worked in the Single Entry Point managing the care management program for home community-based services. Leah has also been a local Ombudsman at the Denver Regional Council of Governments and supervised the assisted living team.  Early in her career, she served as a counselor for children and adolescents who live with trauma and severe mental illness. Leah has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Regis University and a master’s degree in sociology from Northern Arizona University. As the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, Leah is committed to a resident-directed and strength-based approach to advocacy.

Jeremy Bell, MBA, MDR
Deputy State Long-Term Care Ombudsman

jbell@disabilitylawco.org

Jeremy completed his undergraduate education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and graduated with a master’s in business administration at Pepperdine University. He went on to study at the Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution at Pepperdine University, School of Law, where he earned a master’s in dispute resolution. Prior to becoming a long-term care ombudsman in 2015, Jeremy had over 14 years of experience in the healthcare industry. Before joining the Colorado State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program, he was the director of the King County Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program in Seattle, Wash., and in 2018, was named the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman for Indiana.

Vinni Ferrara
Ombudsman Program Manager

vferrara@disabilitylawco.org

Vinni Ferrara became a long-term care ombudsman in 2008 after taking care of her parents for seven years so they could live out their lives in their own home surrounded by family. The experience of being their caregiver and serving as a hospice volunteer gave her a passion for advocacy for seniors. The ombudsman position offered the opportunity to create positive change in long-term care communities and to be the voice of the residents. She finds the work of an ombudsman to be both gratifying and educational and feels fulfilled when she can see the joy in a grateful resident who has a better quality of life and care because of the ombudsman’s efforts.